Dungeons and Dragons: Minotaur

The Minotaur

From Dungeons and Dragons: Monster Manual I, the Minotaur thanks its origins to Greek Mythology.  A horrible, ruthless villain it thought nothing less than to taunt and destroy heroes.

” … typically found only in labyrinthine places in the wilderness or underground.”

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Dungeons and Dragons: Green Slime

DD_GreenSlime The Green Slime

From Dungeons and Dragons: Monster Manual I, the Green Slime was an underground hazard, that made misery of heroes venturing underground for treasure.  It was the D&D version of toxic waste, just not as healthy.

“Green slime will attach itself to living flesh … [turning] the creature into green slime …”

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Dungeons and Dragons: Thought Eater

The Thought Eater

From Dungeons and Dragons: Monster Manual I, the Thought Eater was a ridiculous creature of unknown inspiration.

“… dwellers in the ether … appears to be something like an enormous headed platypus”

Invisible in the physical plane, it was only seen and observed with psionic powers.  (With every gift comes a price, I guess)  If you happen to visit the Ethereal plane, the Thought Eater may pay a visit to eat your brains, figuratively, feeding off your thoughts and intelligence.   As described in the manual, it may render you “a low-grade moron” permanently.

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Dungeons and Dragons: Ki-rin

The Ki-rin

From Dungeons and Dragons: Monster Manual I, we celebrate news from North Korea discovering the “lair of the unicorn rode by King Tongmyong”.  For decades we foolishly kept the Ki-rin (or sometimes spelled Qilin), out from the history books.

“Ki-rin are a race of aerial creatures whose hooves rarely touch the earth, for they dwell amid the clouds and behind the winds.”

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Dungeons and Dragons: Halfling

The Halfling

From Dungeons and Dragons: Monster Manual I, the Halfling was adopted from J. R. R. Tolkien’s “Hobbits”.   The Lord of the Rings inspired humanoid was described in the manual as revered in the Lord of the Rings films.

“Halflings are basically hardworking, orderly, and peaceful citizens …”

The adventures I mastered were never a “Rings” universe.  Partly because I never read a Tolkien novel and it would be nearly another 30 years before the films.  Therefore, the Halfling made rare appearances.  Not they weren’t up to size of a great story, they were simply never popular.  No one wanted to play a Hobbit.  Not even fans of the book.

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